ALCHEMY REDISCOVERED AND
RESTORED

By Archibald Cockren

Philadelphia, David McKay

[1941]

With an account of the extraction of the seed of metals and the preparation of the
medicinal elixir according to the practice of the hermetic Art and of the Alkahest of
the Philosopher

To Mrs. Meyer Sassoon


CONTENTS

PART I

HISTORICAL

CHAPTER

I. BEGINNINGS OF ALCHEMY

II. EARLY EUROPEAN ALCHEMISTS

III. THE STORY OF NICHOLAS FLAMEL

IV. BASIL VALENTINE

V. PARACELSUS

VI. ALCHEMY IN THE SIXTEENTH AND SEVENTEENTH CENTURIES

VII. ENGLISH ALCHEMISTS

VIII. THE COMTE DE ST. GERMAIN

PART II

THEORETICAL

I. THE SEED OF METALS

II. THE SPIRIT OF MERCURY

III. THE QUINTESSENCE

IV. THE QUINTESSENCE IN DAILY LIFE

PART III

I. THE MEDICINE FROM METALS

II. PRACTICAL CONCLUSION

'AUREUS' OR THE GOLDEN TRACTATE THE BOOK OF THE REVELATION OF HERMES


THE SMARAGDINE TABLES OF HERMES TRISMEGISTUS

said to be found in the Valley of Ebron, after the Flood.

1. I speak not fiction, but what is certain and most true.
2. What is below is like that which is above, and what is above is like that which is
below for performing the miracle of one thing.
3. And as all things were produced from One by the Mediation of One, so all things
are produced from this One thing by adaptation.
4. Its father is the Sun, its mother was the Moon, the wind carried it in its belly, its
nurse is the Earth.
5. It is the cause of all perfection throughout the whole world.
6. Its power is perfect if it be changed into the earth.
7. Separate the earth from the fire, the subtle from the gross, gently and with
judgment.
8. It ascends from earth to heaven, and descends again to earth, thus you will possess
the glory of the whole World and all obscurity will fly away.
9. This thing is the fortitude of all fortitude, because it overcomes all subtle things,
and penetrates every solid thing.
p. 12
10. Thus were all things created.
11. Thence proceed wonderful adaptations which are produced in this way.
12. Therefore am I called Hermes Trismegistus, possessing the three parts of the
philosophy of the whole World.
13. What I had to say concerning the operation of the Sun is complete.

FOREWORD

BY SIR DUDLEY BORRON MYERS, O.B.E.

Having been intimately associated with Archibald Cockren during the past ten years, and having long since learnt to place implicit confidence in his efficiency and reliability in all matters to which he has devoted his many remarkable gifts and talents, it affords me real pleasure to write a few words by way of introduction to 'Alchemy Rediscovered and Restored.'
In this book he tells of the sensational work which he has accomplished in once more bringing to light, and to the service of humanity, secrets which baffled the majority of scientists of all ages, and which, for several centuries, have been buried in a grave of doubt and sceptical tradition. That this grave should at last have been opened, and that
the real, albeit hidden secrets which it contained should now stand revealed and proclaimed, must undoubtedly be regarded as an epoch-making event.
I do not myself claim to have any scientific knowledge whatever, but seeing is believing, and I have been privileged to keep in close touch with the author's experiments from the very beginning. Not only have I seen the results achieved, but I, among many others, have been able to test and pay grateful tribute to the efficacy of the Elixirs produced by the alchemical process. These, one may venture to assert, cannot fail as they become better known to prove a very valuable addition to the remedies at present available to mankind.
There is no question of the claims which are put forward in this book being taken on trust. On the contrary they are open to the fullest examination. The proofs are there and they can safely be left to speak for themselves, in the light of the outcome of any investigations to which they may be subjected.
Seeing the far-reaching importance of the author's researches and discoveries it is necessary that some account should be given of his career, and of those qualifications in the wide field of physiology which entitle him to consideration in questions of the treatment of human ailments.
After the necessary period of training he was, in 1904, certificated at the National Hospital for Paralysis and Epilepsy as fully qualified for all purposes of massage, remedial exercises, and electrical treatment. From this hospital he passed on to the staff of the Great Northern Central Hospital, where he remained for several years.
From 1908 onwards, however, he was able to devote part of his time to the private practice in which he then for the first time established himself in the West End of London. This practice had necessarily to be given up during the War.
The years 1915 and 1916 found him in complete charge of all electrical, massage, manipulative, and remedial exercises at the Russian Hospital for British Officers in South Audley Street, London. This hospital, it may be stated, was opened by the Russian nobility resident in London, and was wholly maintained by Russian money. From there he passed on in a similar capacity (1917--18) to the Prisoners of War Hospital. He was at the same time attached to the Millbank Military Hospital. In 1918, he was transferred to the Australian Army, and was on the Peace Conference Staff of the Australian Prime Minister in 1919. Since then, that is to say for the past twenty years, he has been in permanent private practice
in the West End of London.
For over twenty years he has been a keen student of the sciences of metallurgy, Nochemistry, and bacteriology, and it will thus be seen that in the claims he now advances in this book he writes with that measure of authority which a life devoted to the alleviation of suffering, and to the effective treatment of human ailments, undoubtedly confers on him.
It is given to few men to make such momentous discoveries as have rewarded his persistent work and patience. His work has, indeed, to my knowledge, often been pursued under conditions of great difficulty and disappointment. May what he has accomplished in the interests of science and of the human race bring him the reward which he deserves--the reward of general recognition and appreciation of the results achieved.

DUDLEY B. MYERS.



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