Elixirs of Flavoring Plants

ELIXIR OF HYPOPHOSPHITES.

138. ELIXIR OF HYPOPHOSPHITES WITH IRON.

Hypophosphite of calcium,.......... 188 grains
Hypophosphite of sodium,..... ..... 128 grains
Hypophosphite of potassium, ....... 64 grains
Sulphate of iron, in crystals,... ....... 96 grains
Citric acid,........................................... 30 grains
Water,.......................................... 4 fluidounces.
Syrup,........................................... 4 fluidounces.
Aromatic elixir, enough to make 16 fluidounces.

Dissolve the hypophosphites in three fluidounces of water and add the syrup. Dissolve the sulphate of iron in the remainder of the water, then mix the solutions. To this add six fluidounces of aromatic elixir and allow the mixture to stand in a cool place for twelve hours, then filter it. Finally, dissolve the citric acid in the filtrate and pass enough aromatic elixir through the filter to make sixteen fluidounces. Each fluidrachm contains about one-half grain of ferrous
hypophosphite, about one grain each of the hypophosphites of calcium and sodium, and one-half grain of hypophosphite of potassium. This formula is similar to that of the National Formulary and identical in strength.

139. ELIXIR OF AMMONIO-CITRATE OF IRON.
(ELIXIR OF CITRATE OF IRON.)

Ammonio-citrate of iron (soluble citrate),.............................................. 256 grains.
Simple elixir,..............................a sufficient quantity.

Dissolve the ammonio-citrate of iron in twelve fluidounces of simple elixir, and bring this to the measure of sixteen fluidounces by the addition of a sufficient quantity of simple elixir.
Each fluidrachm (teaspoonful) of the finished elixir represents two grains of ammonio-citrate of iron, the same as that adopted by the American Pharmaceutical Association, 1873.

140. ELIXIR OF IPECAC.

Powdered ipecac,........................ troyounce
Balsam of Tolu,.......................... troyounce
Benzoic acid,....................................2 drachms
Opium,..............................................2 drachms
Saffron,........................................ .....2 drachms
Camphor,.................................... ......2 scruples
Oil of anise,.................................1 fluidrachm
Alcohol,.................................................. 2 pints

Macerate the drugs in the alcohol for fourteen days, stirring the mixture thoroughly each day, then filter, and dissolve the camphor and oil of anise in the filtrate.

141. ELIXIR OF BROMIDE OF IRON.

Bromide of iron,........................ .... 256 grains.
Simple elixir,..............................16 fluidounces.

Dissolve the bromide of iron in the simple elixir by triturating them together in a mortar, and then filter. Should the bromide of iron fail to completely dissolve (as is often the case), the product will be accordingly deficient in strength.
Each fluidrachm (teaspoonful) of the finished elixir contains two grains of bromide of iron.

142. ELIXIR OF CITRATE OF IRON WITH QUININE AND STRYCHNINE.

Citrate of iron and quinine,.... .... 256 grains.
Citrate of iron and strychnine,....................... 128 grains.
Simple elixir,..............................14 fluidounces.
Distilled water,...........................2 fluidounces.

Dissolve the citrates in the distilled water, using a moderate heat if required; then add the simple elixir, and filter if necessary.
Each fluidrachm (teaspoonful) of the finished elixir contains two grains of citrate of iron and quinine and one grain of citrate of iron and strychnine. The above proportions were announced in New Remedies, 1878.

143. ELIXIR OF CITRATE OF PROTOXIDE OF IRON.
(ELIXIR OF PROTOXIDE OF IRON. ELIXIR OF FERROUS CITRATE.)

Crystallized sulphate of iron,...... 256 grains.
Bicarbonate of sodium,............ .... 200 grains.
Citric acid, distilled water, ...................................of each a sufficient quantity.

Dissolve the bicarbonate of sodium and the sulphate of iron separately, each in sixteen fluidounces of cold, freshly distilled water, and mix the solutions; pour the mixture into a bottle, which must be filled to the stopper, using more distilled water if necessary, and permit it to rest for twenty four hours. Decant the clear solution and refill the bottle with freshly distilled water, shaking well, and permit it to stand as before. After twenty-four hours decant the solution, pour the residue upon a fine muslin strainer and squeeze the liquid from it.
Dissolve the precipitate by trituration in a mortar with citric acid in sufficient amount, and then add enough simple elixir to make sixteen fluidounces, and filter.
Each fluidrachm (teaspoonful) of the finished elixir contains of citrate of protoxide of iron an amount which is equivalent to two grains of crystallized sulphate of iron. The name “elixir of protoxide of iron” is a misnomer. It is the elixir of a salt of protoxide of iron.
Among the first of the modern elixirs introduced to the medical profession was one under the name “elixir of bark and
protoxide of iron.” This preparation is private property, and we are not acquainted with the formula and process employed in making it. Since its introduction this elixir has enjoyed a popularity which commands for it a constant sale among physicians, and we caution physicians against confusing it with the elixirs we give formulæ for, and which are not elixirs of protoxide of iron, although in commerce they have acquired that title.

144. ELIXIR OF CITRATE AND LACTATE OF IRON.
(ELIXIR OF CITRO-LACTATE OF IRON.)

Lactate of iron,.................................. 96 grains.
Citrate of iron,.................................. 96 grains.
Water,.......................................... 7 fluidounces.
Alcohol,.......................................5 fluidounces.
Simple syrup,............................. 9 fluidounces.
Essence of lemon,...................... ....96 minims
Essence of cloves,.............................. 1 minim

Mix the distilled water and syrup, and dissolve in it the lactate of iron, then add and dissolve the citrate of iron; cool, and mix with this solution the simple syrup and the alcohol, having previously
mixed the alcohol and essences together. Lastly, color the product with caramel until it is about the color of brandy, and then filter it. Lactate of iron is often only partially soluble in water, but the syrup aids its solution. If it refuses to entirely dissolve, there will be a deficiency of this substance.
The foregoing elixir acquired, we are told, considerable reputation in France, where it was devised by “Robineaud of
Bordeaux,” and who finally published the formula. (See Proceedings of the American Pharmaceutical Association, 1871, p. 321.)

145. ELIXIR OF CHLORIDE OF IRON WITH
AMMONIUM CITRATE AND GENTIAN.
(ELIXIR OF GENTIAN AND IRON. FERRATED ELIXIR OF GENTIAN.)

Fluid extract of gentian,....................... fluidounce
Solution of citrate of ammonium,.....1 fluidounce
Tincture of chloride of iron,................ fluidounce
Simple elixir, carbonate of magnesium, distilled water,.....................of each a sufficient quantity.

Triturate the fluid extract of gentian in a mortar with carbonate of magnesium in amount sufficient to form a thick paste,
and then gradually add four fluidounces of distilled water and filter.
Mix the tincture of chloride of iron with the solution of citrate of ammonium and add to the preceding filtrate, and then add of simple elixir a sufficient amount to make the whole measure sixteen fluidounces.
Each fluidrachm (teaspoonful) of the finished elixir contains about two minims each of tincture of chloride of iron and fluid extract of gentian. The citrate of ammonium is introduced to prevent blackening of the elixir, as explained under elixir of calisaya and chloride of iron with citrate of ammonium. ’
Elixir of gentian and chloride of iron was mentioned first in the Druggists’ Circular, 1871, and afterward (1873) Prof. Joseph P. Remington presented a process through the American Journal of Pharmacy. The Newark Pharmaceutical Association (1871) recommended an elixir of gentian and pyrophosphate of iron, and at a still earlier date Mr. William B. Thompson had presented a process for this elixir through the Druggists’ Circular.

146. ELIXIR OF CHLORIDE OF IRON WITH HYDROCHLORATE
OF QUININE AND ARSENIOUS ACID.
(ELIXIR OF IRON, QUINIA, AND ARSENIC.)

Hydrochlorate of quinine,............. 64 grains.
Solution of arsenious acid (U. S. P., 1883),..........................................128 minims.
Simple elixir,..............................15 fluidounces.
Tincture of chloride of iron,... 1 fluidounce.
Hydrochloric acid,..................... a sufficient quantity.

Triturate the hydrochlorate of quinine in a mortar with four fluidounces of simple elixir, and add of hydrochloric acid an amount sufficient to effect its solution; then add the remainder of the simple elixir and the other ingredients. Filter if necessary. If hydrochlorate of quinine cannot be obtained, use quinine alkaloid instead, and hydrochloric acid enough to dissolve it.
Each fluidrachm (teaspoonful) of the finished elixir contains about three and one-half minims of tincture of chloride of iron, onehalf grain of hydrochlorate of quinine, and one minim of officinal solution of arsenic.
Our formula introduces the hydrochlorate of quinine, chloride of iron, and solution of arsenious acid in hydrochloric acid.
Too great caution cannot be employed to prevent the precipitation of arsenic, and by using hydrochloric acid this tendency to separation is avoided.

147. ELIXIR OF PROTOCHLORIDE OF IRON.
(ELIXIR OF FERROUS CHLORIDE.)

Crystallized sulphate of iron,...... 256 grains.
Bicarbonate of sodium,............ .... 200 grains.
Hydrochloric acid, simple elixir, distilled water,......................of each a sufficient quantity.

Dissolve the sulphate of iron and bicarbonate of sodium separately, each in sixteen fluidounces of distilled water, and mix the solutions; pour the mixture into a bottle, which must be filled to the stopper, using more distilled water if necessary, and permit it to rest twenty-four hours; decant the clear solution and refill the bottle with freshly distilled water, shaking well, and permit it to stand as before.
After twenty-four hours decant the solution; pour the residue upon a fine muslin strainer and squeeze the liquid from it. Dissolve the precipitate by trituration in a mortar with hydrochloric acid in sufficient amount, and then add enough simple elixir to make sixteen fluidounces, and filter it.
Each fluidrachm (teaspoonful) of the finished elixir contains of chloride of protoxide of iron (ferrous chloride) an amount which is equivalent to two grains of crystallized sulphate of iron.
This elixir may also be made by the action of hydrochloric acid on metallic iron, using the same amount of acid, two hundred grains of iron, two fluidounces of water, and a sufficient quantity of simple elixir. Digest the iron, water, and acid together until the action ceases; filter, and mix the filtrate with simple elixir in amount sufficient to form sixteen fluidounces. This preparation is unstable.

148. ELIXIR OF HYPOPHOSPHITE OF IRON.

Hypophosphite of calcium,......... 128 grains.
Citrate of potassium,........................ 96 grains
Solution of chloride of iron (ferric chloride),
simple elixir, distilled water, .................................of each a sufficient quantity.

Dissolve the hypophosphite of calcium in four fluidounces of distilled water, and carefully add solution of chloride of iron until in very slight excess. Collect the precipitate and wash it until nearly free from chloride of calcium.
Dissolve the magma produced by the foregoing operation in eight fluidounces of simple elixir, by the aid of the citrate of potassium, and then add enough simple elixir to bring the whole to the measure of sixteen fluidounces.
Each fluidrachm (teaspoonful) of the finished elixir contains three-fourths of a grain of ferric hypophosphite. This improved method for making solution of hypophosphite of iron was introduced by Prof. C. Lewis Diehl in a paper read before the Kentucky Pharmaceutical Association, 1882. The original was not in our possession, and we received the abstract presented in the Proceedings of the American Pharmaceutical Association just in time to insert this one formula.

149. ELIXIR OF IODIDE OF IRON WITH IODIDE OF QUININE.
(ELIXIR OF IODIDE OF IRON AND QUINIA. )

Iodide of iron,................................... 16 grains.
Iodide of quinine,............................ 16 grains.
Simple elixir,..............................16 fluidounces.

Triturate the iodides in a mortar with the simple elixir adding a little hydriodic acid if necessary, and, when they are dissolved, filter if desirable.
Each fluidrachm (teaspoonful) of the finished elixir contains one-eighth grain each of iodide of iron and of iodide of quinine. This formula was announced in the Druggists’ Circular, 1867.

150. ELIXIR OF LACTATE OF IRON.

Lactate of iron,................................ 128 grains.
Lactic acid, simple elixir,
...................................of each a sufficient quantity.

Triturate the lactate of iron in a mortar with fourteen fluidounces of simple elixir, and add of lactic acid a quantity sufficient to render the liquid distinctly acid; then add enough simple elixir to bring the whole to the measure of sixteen fluidounces, and filter.
Each fluidrachm (teaspoonful) of the finished elixir contains one grain of lactate of iron.
The National Formulary recommends that one hundred and twenty-eight grains of lactate of iron, in crusts, and three hundred and eighty-four grains of citrate of potassium be dissolved in enough aromatic elixir to make sixteen fluidounces. Each fluidrachm contains one grain of lactate of iron. This formula is preferable to the foregoing.

151. ELIXIR OF LACTATE OF IRON WITH PEPSIN.

Elixir of lactate of iron,8 fluidounces.
Elixir of pepsin,8 fluidounces.
Mix them together.

Each fluidrachm (teaspoonful) of the finished elixir contains two grains each of lactate of iron and saccharated pepsin.

152. ELIXIR OF PHOSPHATE OF IRON.
Phosphate of iron, soluble (U. S. P.
1883),...............................................256 grains.
Simple elixir,...................................12 fluidounces.
Distilled water,.................................4 fluidounces.

Dissolve the phosphate of iron in the distilled water and add the simple elixir.
Each fluidrachm (teaspoonful) of the finished elixir contains two grains of phosphate of iron.
In former editions of this work each fluidrachm represented one grain of phosphate of iron. The National Formulary has
established two grains as the preferable amount, and in this edition we have accepted that quantity.

153. ELIXIR OF PHOSPHATE OF IRON WITH PHOSPHATE OF QUININE.
(ELIXIR OF PHOSPHATE OF IRON AND QUINIA.)

Elixir of phosphate of iron,..............................8 fluidounces.
Elixir of phosphate of quinine,.......................8 fluidounces
Mix them together.

Each fluidrachm (teaspoonful) of the finished elixir contains one-half grain each of phosphate of iron and phosphate of quinine.

154. ELIXIR OF PHOSPHATE OF IRON WITH PHOSPHATE OF
QUININE AND STRYCHNINE.
(ELIXIR OF PHOSPHATE OF IRON, QUINIA, AND STRYCHNIA.)

Elixir of phosphate of iron and quinine,....16 fluidounces.
Strychnine,..................................................................1 grains.
Acetic acid,...........................................a sufficient quantity.

Triturate the strychnine in a mortar with acetic acid in amount sufficient to effect its solution, and then add the elixir. Filter if necessary.
Each fluidrachm (teaspoonful) of the finished elixir contains one-half grain each of phosphates of iron and quinine, and onehundredth of a grain of strychnine.
In 1878 Mr. J. Creuse contributed an article to the Druggists’ Circular regarding a preparation sold under the name of the foregoing elixir, which proved to be an elixir of pyrophosphate of iron. It is also true that other preparations containing pyrophosphate of iron are sometimes dispensed where phosphate is specified, and physicians should be careful and use the abbreviation phos. only when the phosphate is desired.





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